BPL Blog

Posted by BHanley on Wed, Oct 12
Author Tom Bissell visits sites that claim to be the tombs of the twelve apostles to investigate and better understand biblical, historical, and apocryphal accounts of early Christianity.  He hopes to unravel the varied and sometimes perplexing stories of Jesus’ closest companions as they have come to us and examines their differing perspectives on how to spread Jesus’ teachings. Bissell’s travels take him to Europe, the Middle East, and Asia, where he converses with archeologists, clergy, and...
Posted by BHanley on Wed, Oct 12
This compact book explores the lives and work of two iconic figures of design and the decorative arts: England’s William Morris (1834-96) and Mariano Fortuny (1871-1949), born in Spain but later residing in Venice. Morris is best known for his influence on all aspects of the British Arts & Crafts Movement and his many contributions to literature and the book arts. Fortuny’s accomplishments range from bold fashion designs, such as his famous “Delphos” dress, and new fabric dyeing techniques...
Posted by JDavanza on Thu, Oct 06
On August 15 the library's cookbook club met for dinner with Mexican cookbooks by Rick Bayless, the most we've ever tasted and rated in one meeting...seven cookbooks. It was also our one year anniversary meeting which we celebrated at the home of one of our members, where we were able try two of Rick's recipes for imbibing. They included:   Authenic Mexico: Regional Cooking From the Heart of Mexico first published in 1987 and then...
Posted by JGranatino on Wed, Oct 05
Readers may think that The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo is going to be all jokes but it is really a collection of essays over the course of Schumer’s life. The stories are not in any particular order and range from talking about her upbringing, to first jobs and an eclectic collection of relationship stories.  Schumer will surprise you with her vulnerability and admission of being an introvert, along with all of the happiness and heartbreak that has led her to the life she leads now...
Posted by JGranatino on Mon, Sep 26
Sleeping Giants is an entertaining science fiction novel about the discovery of artifacts resembling gigantic stone body parts, and the people whose lives revolve around that discovery. It is written like a collection of interviews, and in chronological order, readers gleam events through the words of eye witnesses. Sleeping Giants progresses under the guidance of a nameless agent, the curator of the interview files that comprise the book's content. This novel is a fun foray...
Posted by JGranatino on Tue, Sep 20
Gail Caldwell's title, Let's Take the Long Way Home: A Memoir of Friendship, is the story of Caldwell's friendship with writer Caroline Knapp. They initially met while walking their beloved dogs, and the friendship quickly developed into one of those rare and lasting relationships between women, sisters-in-heart. They shared a love for long hikes through the woods of New England, competitive kayaking, their struggles with alcoholism and with men, and of course their dogs, always by...
Posted by JGranatino on Tue, Sep 20
In Girls on Film, a flash fiction collection of short stories, Kathryn Kulpa has created memorable young women with dreams and desires both real and imaginary within the cinematic world. Each chapter is a delight, her prose precise as in the story Maybelline, an entire tableau within one sentence. Kulpa weaves her stories with skill, drawing the reader into the minds and hearts of the young women she portrays. To be savored.
Posted by JGranatino on Mon, Sep 19
  Jacob, a teenager living in Florida, experiences a family tragedy and all that is left are the mysterious clues left behind by his eccentric grandfather. The first few chapters are on the slow side but they compliment the slow pace of life that Jacob is experiencing at this time. After receiving a mystifying present Jacob sets out on an adventurous journey to a remote island near Wales with his father. Readers are taken on an exploration of abandoned buildings as he tries to put the pieces of...
Posted by JGranatino on Sat, Sep 10
Feed is a dystopian young adult science-fiction story. Titus and his friends head to the moon for a party like every other day but a hacker causes all of their feeds to malfunction this time including an intelligent girl, Violet, who hasn’t always had the feed. It’s a smart, satirical story that explores consumerism, star-crossed teenage love, and identity crises. The audiobook for this story is highly recommended...
Posted by JGranatino on Wed, Sep 07
The Sleeper and the Spindle is an empowering fairy tale and that almost feels like a hybrid of Snow White and Sleeping Beauty.  A princess seems as if she is bound to sleep forever, along with everyone in her castle sleeps while a queen in another kingdom is about to marry. After the queen finds out of this plague of sleep that is spreading like wildfire she sets out on a quest to stop it. It is the perfect magical story with mesmerizing illustrations for all ages. The Sleeper and...

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