BPL Blog

Posted by JGranatino on Tue, May 24
Exposure by Helen Dunmore It’s London in 1960 and the Cold War is at its height with spy fever filling the newspapers and the country. After a file goes missing, a man is accused and arrested by the government for treason. The lives of his family and another agent are intimately involved in this top notch psychological thriller-drama. Dunmore’s impressive storytelling and gentle, emotional prose kept the story moving and alive. I immersed in her 1960’s English world of post-WWII and...
Posted by JGranatino on Tue, May 24
Spill Simmer Falter Wither by Sara Baume Reading, reading, reading…Spill Simmer Falter Wither, a debut novel by Sara Baume, is a beautifully written tale of two damaged souls, one a one-eyed dog, who come together in loneliness and mutual comfort over the course of a year. Her prose is poetic with haunting descriptions of the Irish coast and countryside. Written in narrative style of both man and dog, Baume portrays the cruelty both characters have endured in the past which now bonds...
Posted by JGranatino on Mon, May 09
Miller’s Valley by Anna Quindlen Mimi Miller lives on the farm her family has owned for generations, a hardscrabble existence at best. A government agent is visiting the families in Miller’s Valley, trying to get them to sign off on their farms to make way for a new reservoir. Quindlen tells the family’s story from Mimi’s perspective, a coming-of-age in the sixties tale with family secrets, false friends and a brother who returns from Vietnam a changed and damaged man. As Mimi...
Posted by JGranatino on Mon, May 09
When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi At the age of 36, Dr. Paul Kalanithi had everyone he had strived for: a thriving practice as a neurosurgeon, recognition among his peers, a loving wife and unlimited prospects for the future. A lingering cough and back spasms became cause for concern during a trip with friends; a xray and subsequent scans confirmed the preliminary diagnosis of inoperable lung cancer. Kalanithi shares his journey with the reader, philosophically addressing how...
Posted by JGranatino on Tue, May 03
The Summer Before the War by Helen Simonson In the summer before the first World War, the town of Rye was lovely and peaceful. Flowers bloomed, gardens flourished and the townspeople carried on their daily lives as they had always done. Beatrice Nash, whose father had passed leaving her with little means, has come to teach the young people proper Latin and soon meets Hugh, a comely young surgeon-in-training and nephew of one of the county’s elite. One of her prize students, a Romany...
Posted by JDavanza on Mon, May 02
Posted by JGranatino on Sat, Apr 30
The Bell Tower by Sarah Rayne This novel is the sixth in Sarah Rayne’s Haunted House mysteries; however, you will not need to read previous installments. It is a thoroughly enjoyable historical/contemporary mystery-horror novel. It begins with the protagonist extending her Oxford antiques shop and, during renovation, uncovers fragments from the past. Her discovery sparks an alluring and thrilling journey that ably mixes past and present. The past drives maddeningly forward in three different...
Posted by JGranatino on Tue, Apr 26
Dear Mr. You by Mary-Louise Parker In a series of letters, award-winning actress Mary-Louise Parker weaves her stories through correspondence, both real and imagined, to the grandfather she never knew to past loves to a fireman walking through the streets in the aftermath of 9/11. Almost poetic in her prose, she takes us on her journey through joy and pain. Parker can be seen as childlike, innocent, snarky as well as fiercely strong through her letters. This slim volume could be read...
Posted by JGranatino on Tue, Apr 26
The Road to Little Dribbling: the adventures of an American in Britain by Bill Bryson Once again, humorist Bill Bryson takes us on a journey as he revisits old haunts from Notes From a Small Island and explores new territory in England, Scotland and Wales. Bryson’s sequel is both charming and hilarious whether he’s walking among ancient ruins such as Stonehenge, looking for a place to rest his head after a day’s travel or describing an uneasy meeting with a Scottish...
Posted by JGranatino on Wed, Apr 13
A Mother’s Reckoning: Living in the Aftermath of the Columbine Tragedy By: Sue Klebold A Mother’s Reckoning is told by Sue Klebold, the mother of one of the shooters in the Columbine massacre.  Sue gives a brutally honest account from the time she received the phone call from her husband that there was an actual emergency; all the way to the heart-wrenching discovery of her son’s desire to die.  Throughout the book, she never makes excuses for Dylan’s monstrous actions, but tries to understand...

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